Extended! See the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival Sand Sculpture Exhibit Through Oct. 5

October 2nd, 2014 by Sherry Friel

sand2Procrastination is perhaps the worst of my many shortcomings. If there is a task or chore I don’t want to do, I’ll put it off until the bitter end. In fact, I can recall suddenly believing the oven HAD TO BE CLEANED just days before an important deadline for a job I dreaded. What’s worse is lately I’ve noticed a tendency to procrastinate even when it comes to planning pleasurable activities. While my prevailing motivation in life has always been to live it deliberately and passionately, there are still many missed opportunities because I’ll put them off for, you know, when I have time.sand face

For example, not long ago I missed a long-running exhibition of Marc Sijan’s hyper-realistic sculptures at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art. I had marked my calendar, and was excited about seeing his work well in advance of the exhibition’s opening. Although I intended to go just about every week that summer, I never made it, and regret having missed this sculptor’s exquisite work.

So when I noticed the viewing time had been extended for the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival Sandsculpting Championship through Oct. 5, I was very excited. Excited, because I knew if I missed opening weekend, I’d at least have the next week to see this collection of work by some of the most talented sand sculptors in the world. I’m pretty proud of myself in that not only did I make time to see the works, I did it the very first night of the exhibit! The best part was viewing each of the 22 exquisitely-crafted sand sculptures at sunset, when the sun’s glow beautifully illuminated intricate details impossible to capture with the camera or describe with words. You simply must go there. And don’t procrastinate!

Here are some interesting facts about this signature event of the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival:

*32 of the world’s most talented sculptors compete for the largest prize purse in the country in this internationally-recognized championship. Read their biographies here.

*Each season, the sandsculpting championship gets better. New this year: improved lighting for viewing into the evening hours and expanded walkways offering intimate views of the artwork. I was able to photograph each work as a whole, as well as intricate details I wanted to study after I got home.

*This stunning gallery is located beneath a tent almost as large as a football field, protecting it from wind and rain, and improving accessibility in inclement weather.

Nat and sand 1

*Smooth walkways ensure wheelchair as well as stroller accessibility.

*While the admission is $5 for adults, it’s totally free for kids under 12. Hold on to your ticket stub too because each features a substantial coupon redeemable for lunch at one of four Oceanfront restaurants.

I am so happy to have experienced these sculptures-each possessing such profound, ephemeral beauty. I’d love to return once more before each piece is rendered back into sand and sea, but I know I will not be able to. Noting this impermanence is a bittersweet reminder that although much of the symbolism of these sculptures will stay with me and wash up from time to time, I will never see them again. No one will. It’s certainly a call to embrace the beauty of each new moment. Starting the weekend with these beautiful sculptures was a reminder that I need to stop procrastinating when it comes to rare opportunities such as this. I intend to make the Sand Sculpting Championship a family tradition that takes place regardless of how busy I might be or how much work awaits. There should always be time for beauty such as this.natskipsand

Photo credits:  Sherry Friel


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Pick Your Favorite Fish

October 1st, 2014 by Mike Halperin

Some fine spot from Rudee Inlet!

Some fine spot from Rudee Inlet!

A late September day turned into a perfect pick for this fishing blogger to enjoy a Rudee Inlet creel check. My day’s efforts provided a wide variety of fish including croaker, speckled trout, bluefish, flounder and spot.  Spot were the most cooperative species, with many spot as large as 12 ounces and most fish averaging 6 to 10 ounces.  An occasional double header even served to punctuate the action.   Spot fishing will only improve as more fall nor’easters concentrate more fish and put them on a huge migratory feed. The day I fished, Norfolk spot were responsible for many heavy coolers and big smiles.

Captain’s Tip: While spot love fresh bloodworms, try enhancing the offering with a small piece of Fishbites on the hook. For still more attraction, use small # 2 gold hooks with gold spinner blades.  This will maximize bites with the double benefit of sight and smell to draw fish to your hooks!

Local Int'l Gamefish Rep Dr. Julie Ball has plenty to smile about with this striped bass!

Local Int'l Gamefish Rep Dr. Julie Ball has plenty to smile about with this striped bass!

October spells striped bass! Fall striper season officially opens at midnight October 4th.  Anglers fishing CBBT structure have already reported plenty of 18 to 28-inch slot limit stripers.  Up to two bass may be kept per day, however, one of those fish may exceed 28 inches.   While many bass anglers prefer targeting monster rockfish in November through January, smaller bass offer great light tackle sport and superb table fare.   Bluefish and trout could also be in the mix around tunnel pilings and swift currents.  Try swim baits for top action in bridge light lines after dark.

Red drum fishing continues red hot! Juvenile red drum, better known as puppy drum, are lingering inside Virginia Beach inlets and back waters.  Bull or large red drum are on the move and actively feeding from the 3rd Island of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel to inshore spots including the two southernmost Virginia piers.  Virginia Saltwater Fishing Tournament citation fish, up to 53-inch releases, have been caught from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay including the Concrete Ships region.  Buoy 36 “A” near Cape Charles has been a hot spot for large drum with “horse” croaker holding closer to shore in that same area.

Flounder are still here to help fill freezers before winter. Top October locations are normally the 4th Island and High Rise Bridge areas of the CBBT.  Some flounder as large as 26 inches still remain in the Lynnhaven basin and inside Rudee Inlet.  Some of the biggest and best flatfish hauls will come from inshore wrecks prior to the flounder departing.  Triggerfish are also still on the wrecks.

Wayne Seymour's king mackerel

Wayne Seymour's king mackerel

Cobia may still be available for a short period as they exit the mouth of the Bay and swim south out of our waters. Work the CB buoy line and also the shoreline along the southern beaches.

Speckled trout will be on the upswing in both size and numbers in October. Tackle as light as 10 lb. test will put your skill to the test while maximizing the fun factor! Fish area inlets and the CBBT.

Virginia Beach angler and state record holder (barracuda) Wayne Seymour hooked and landed a 25 lb. 8 oz. king mackerel while trolling a swimming plug. The mackerel was caught southeast of Rudee Inlet barely two miles off the beach!

White marlin have topped the offshore list whenever boats are able to fish between blows. The billfish have fallen for both trolled and live baits fished in the vicinity of Norfolk Canyon.  Blue marlin and wahoo continue to remain in this blue water mix while dolphin appear all but finished for the season.

Wreck fishermen are finding large sea bass averaging around 3 lbs. with some bass up to 5 or 6 lbs. Continental Shelf deep-drop trips offer a varied bonanza including blueline tilefish of mostly 4 to 5 lbs. but ranging up to 18 lb. citations.  Other species hitting the dock from these trips are barrelfish, black bellied rosefish and the occasional grouper.

Reminder: With all the fishing pressure now on top target species such as white marlin, striped bass and red drum, don’t forget about sheepshead and triggerfish as they continue to feed around pilings, wrecks and rubble.

Best Bites:

Inshore: Norfolk spot

Chesapeake Bay: Striped Bass, flounder, red drum

Offshore: White marlin

Offshore Wrecks: Blueline tilefish

Red Drum by Duane Raver

Red Drum by Duane Raver

Noteworthy Catches:

Multiple white marlin (Norfolk Canyon) and red drum (Chesapeake Bay) release citations.

New Rudee Walkway to the VB Fishing Center

New Rudee Walkway to the VB Fishing Center

Newsworthy: The long awaited walkway connecting Rudee Inlet Fishing Center to the fishing seawall and boardwalk is now functionally finished. Anglers can now walk safely to and from the fishing center to get bait without having to move their vehicle!

fishing-boatCaptain’s Log: This is the absolute best time of year to get outdoors and sample some world-class Virginia Beach fishing from surf, pier or boat while enjoying wonderful fall weather!

Don’t just watch football!

See you on the water.

Tight lines and hard strikes to all!

Capt. Mike


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An Oceanside Art Gallery

September 30th, 2014 by Katherine Jackson

Neptune 1Walking on the Virginia Beach Boardwalk is always fun because there’s always so much to see. That’s doubly true during the annual Neptune Festival Art and Craft Show in September. This year, from 18th Street to 29th Street, in booth after booth, more than 270 exhibitors displayed the products of their imagination in every medium: watercolor, wood, oil, leather, gold, silver, shells and clay. The show is juried, and the selected artists and craftsmen mounted an outstanding and diverse display. There were large scale paintings, many with beachy themes, and small scale fused glass pendants. There were hand-built wooden rocking chairs and woven sweet grass baskets. There was a lion made of driftwood and a neon flamingo. There was art recycled from vintage china, and jewelry made from rocks. There was wearable art, such as dresses, scarves, and hats. There was even art for pets: wooden water bowl stands, and collars and leashes in a rainbow of colors and patterns.Neptune 3

I went to the show on Friday, thinking it would be a less popular choice than the weekend, but the place was alive with art lovers. The weather played a part: it was an ideal fall afternoon, with warm sun and a cool breeze. The artists, some locals and others from around the country, were eager to chat about their materials and methods, and to sell their wares, many of which were affordably priced, especially considering every piece was made by hand. One artist told me that the Neptune Festival is her favorite show because the location is so pleasant and the locals are so friendly. With the beach, the ocean and the bright blue sky as a backdrop, the art show was indeed a perfect place for a stroll.

Neptune 4

Art is just one part of the Neptune Festival Boardwalk Weekend, which happens on the last weekend in September every year. There’s also live music on numerous stages, a sandsculpting contest, a parade, an 8K run, and fireworks to celebrate the end of summer and usher in the fall. Festival food vendors sell everything from crab cakes to kettle corn. And open-air cafes along the strand provide a comfortable place to relax and people watch. At the north end of the art show, King Neptune – god of the sea – presides over the Boardwalk in the form of a massive bronze sculpture, and he lends his name to the festival every year. However, perhaps it’s Apollo – god of the arts – who deserves credit for inspiring the creativity that turns the Boardwalk into a spectacular oceanside art gallery. But don’t tell Neptune I said that.


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The Beach Report – September 26, 2014

September 26th, 2014 by Teresa Diaz

Kind Neptune by Pasquale

Kind Neptune by Pasquale

Ah, September!  Cooler evenings, light jackets, brisk walks on the beach and my favorite festival, a tribute to our King! King Neptune is”THE MAN” as Virginia Beach residents and visitors alike gather during September to celebrate him with a parade, a court of princesses, a fantastic artshow & free concerts on “his” boardwalk,  a wine festival, a sandsculpting competition, the works! If you aren’t here yet, there’s still time.  We’ll be bowing to him all weekend and then some. Come raise your glass to him from, wait for it………..his own beachfront park! Like I said, Neptune is “THE MAN!”

Virginia Beach Neptune Festival Website


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At 11 years old, this budding Virginia Beach chef aims to create ‘legendary’ sandwiches, savory soups, and ‘epic’ sauces

September 24th, 2014 by Sherry Friel
Nathaniel is a big believer in presentation.....not only does the recipe need to TASTE good, it should look good too!

Nathaniel is a big believer in presentation.....not only does the recipe need to TASTE good, it should look good too!

I’m not sure when it all started, but it’s safe to say at this point that my 11-year-old son Nathaniel loves food. I know, most people find great pleasure in enjoying a good meal, but believe me, my son’s love of cuisine goes beyond a few favorite dishes. This is something different. This kid was just 5 years old when, to my amazement, he perfectly cracked an egg into a bowl for a recipe-no shell fragments, just a clean break along the center and an intact egg white and yolk in the bowl. How does he do that? To this day, he still cracks eggs for me because I have yet to prepare a dish without having to fish eggshell remnants from the batter.

Indeed, Nathaniel is passionate about food and obsessed with the spices, herbs and preparation of just about any dish you can imagine. His grocery store lists have included cilantro, red curry powder, chili powder, onion, and more. In the kitchen, he flies from counter to counter, chopping this, blending that, and tasting it all. In advance of planning a dish, he’ll declare he wants to create the most “legendary sandwich ever” or a sauce that is “epic.” It is no exaggeration when I tell friends he’d be just as happy with a new KitchenAid stand mixer or Cuisinart panini press as he would with the latest Apple product.

I’ve learned from him too. Did you know that if you press a divot in the center of a thick burger, it cooks more evenly? And never, ever pierce the burger while it is cooking, because you will lose the juice that makes it extra tasty. Another tip from Nathaniel is to only flip the burger once if you can help it. It’s just better that way. And perfect popcorn? Not a problem. To get his secret mixture of butter and seasonings evenly distributed, he uses a large container with a lid so he can shake it all together. I enjoy his popcorn so much I’m afraid to ask just how much butter is involved.

cooking2His specialties, to date, are guacamole dip, hot sandwiches, and breakfast food. He’s still working on the perfect soup, and has recently developed an interest in making spicy sauces, calamari, and soda. He has tried recipes for all of the aforementioned except calamari, but I have a feeling we will be visiting one of Virginia Beach’s many seafood markets in search of fresh squid really soon.

I wish I could say I have been a good influence on his eating habits, but I take absolutely no credit. Perhaps he was inspired by movies such as Ratatouille, or watching his uncle Randy prepare one of his many sumptuous meals in our kitchen. Or it could have been that everywhere in Virginia Beach, and I do mean everywhere, the aromas of a variety of foods waft through the air starting at lunchtime and into the evening. Shopping at Hilltop or strolling the sidewalks of Town Center can certainly be a sensory feast. Many a time Nathaniel has exclaimed how his mouth simply drooled as we inhaled the scent of hickory-smoked air infused with notes of Indian, Thai, Vietnamese, Mediterranean, or Mexican cuisine. Just try shopping for office supplies anywhere in the city without stopping somewhere to eat. It’s practically impossible and we have yet to try it all! So it came as no surprise when Virginia Beach’s foodie focus got a nod from Huffington Post’s Andrea Poe. According to the article, the region boasts an abundance of locally-sourced food and a thriving culinary scene. We know, we know!

We are fortunate to live near Hilltop and La Promenade, home to two highly-rated kitchen supply stores. I have no doubt the time we spent exploring these stores played a role in inspiring my son’s interests. We’ve spent many an afternoon perusing kitchen tools, dreaming of new recipes to try, or talking about cooking classes to take. Additionally, we recently found an extensive selection of cookbooks at the Virginia Beach Public Library and that has inspired even more ideas for fun in the kitchen.

One can only imagine where Nathaniel’s interests will be as he matures and enters adulthood, but it’s a pretty sure bet his passion for good food is here to stay. With the start of school, he hasn’t had much time for cooking. Homework takes priority and it’s driving him crazy. Just the other day as he worked through math problems, I chopped the ingredients for the tacos he wanted to make. Ordinarily, he prefers to prepare the ingredients himself, but he reluctantly allowed me back into the kitchen. I was given very specific instructions too: “Chop the lettuce really fine, okay? Just make it lots of little strips” and “You can keep the onions and tomatoes a little chunky. You don’t have to chop those as small.” I felt as if the roles had reversed! For the first time, he was telling me how to prepare a meal. And that is just fine by me. I gratefully hand over the spatula and cutting board. Bon appetite!cooking1

Photo credits: Sherry Friel


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September Spells Red Hot Fishing

September 22nd, 2014 by Mike Halperin
Fishing Blog # 106
September 15, 2014
September Spells Red Hot Fishing
Memorable angling awaits fishermen seeking white marlin, cobia, croaker, tilefish, flounder and spot along with numerous other soon-to-migrate species. Students are back in school now just as many species also “school up” prior to leaving Virginia Beach waters. Simply put, this is prime time to sample our waters. And oh, did anyone mention less angling pressure too? Normally idyllic fall weather and fall lodging rates combine to make September and October must fish months for Virginia Beach.
White marlin fishing continues to be world-class bar none! Boats choosing to troll are averaging four to six hookups per trip while those working live baits are attracting up to 20 billfish a trip! This fishery has traditionally stayed reel-screaming hot through September. Blue marlin, wahoo, dolphin and tuna make up the rest of the offshore mix.
Cobia are now feeding from Cape Charles across the mouth of Chesapeake Bay and east to Cape Henry as well as along the oceanfront. Splendid catches are also coming from the line of CB buoys leading into the Bay. Many fish exceed 50 pounds.
Red drum are schooling off Cape Charles and will be heading south to offer great sport while migrating past the oceanfront and Sandbridge surf. Juvenile red drum, also known as “puppy drum,” are biting inside the inlets with Lynnhaven Inlet providing top action.
Spot remain a popular target species inside Rudee and Lynnhaven Inlets. Most spot now run two to a pound, with some fish close to twelve ounces or more. It remains to be seen whether this will be a year where one-pound citation-size spot make an appearance.
Bluefish and Spanish mackerel are still actively feeding. Tide rips at Cape Henry and CBBT channel openings between the rock islands are good bets for both species. Troll small gold and silver Clark spoons (#00) to access this action. With all the bait in the water, there were even two great catches made right outside Rudee Inlet: a 35 lb. king mackerel and a 4 lb. Spanish mackerel! Both fish qualified for free Virginia Saltwater Fishing Tournament citations.
Flounder are another species on the inshore favorites list. Flatfish limits to 23 inches are coming from areas including the Small Boat Channel, the Yancey Wreck, the 3rd and 4th islands of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, ship channel edges, and the 8 and 12-mile markers of the CBBT. Moreover, the CBBT Highrise Bridge area normally becomes a flounder hot spot in October. Inlet flounder, while trending smaller, are also still biting. Fish with Gulp, live minnows and strip baits for best results.
Croaker are peaking now with plenty of fish exceeding 12 inches. Find a croaker school and action can be non-stop! Sheepshead, triggerfish and spadefish are still here with spadefish biting well around the 4th island of the CBBT. Fish tight to structure and don’t wait – all four species will soon be gone.
Grey trout promise fast action – if you can locate a school. Sonar scanning works well to reveal trout schools. Good starting points are the northern stretch of the CBBT, particularly around the 12-mile post and the Highrise Bridge.
Captain’s Tip: To increase chances for a citation spot (16 ounces), fish a Carolina rig with a small egg sinker coupled with a #4 hook and a generous piece of bloodworm. High-low bottom rigs are traditional, but this rig should attract larger spot for you.
Steer 113 degrees from Cape Henry, travel 30 miles east and you arrive at a fish magnet called the Powell wreck. As part of the “Triangle Wrecks,” which includes the World War II vessels Luckenback and Morgan, these ships are currently frequented by super-size flounder, spadefish, amberjack and jumbo black sea bass. As fall shifts to winter, the same wrecks will soon hold voracious bluefish along with tasty tautog and codfish. The Triangle Wrecks are just one of many offshore fishing locations drawing anglers to Virginia Beach waters. Enjoying this fishing smorgasbord is only a charter or head boat reservation away!
In the deep: Tilefish continue to be a top draw for offshore trips to the Continental Shelf. There is a real chance here for a saltwater fishing citation coupled with some great fishing. Other typical catches on these trips are large sea bass, barrelfish, black-bellied rosefish and grouper.
Other late season possible catches are amberjack at the South Tower southeast of Rudee Inlet along with feisty jack crevalle in inshore waters.
Noteworthy Catches: Among recent citations: a 181 lb. bigeye tuna (Norfolk Canyon), 52 lb. wahoo (Norfolk Canyon), 67 lb. cobia (CB Buoy line), 35 lb. king mackerel (outside Rudee Inlet), 30 lb. bull dolphin, 4 lb. Spanish mackerel (outside Rudee Inlet), and a 4 lb. 4 oz. triggerfish (CBBT)
Best Bets:
Offshore: White marlin
Inshore: Cobia, croaker, flounder
Inlets: Spot, croaker
Deep Drop: Blueline tilefish
See you on the water. Tight lines and hard strikes to all!
Capt. Mike
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Teresa,
Here are the links:
1- Virginia Saltwater Fishing Tournament
http://www.mrc.virginia.gov/vswft/index.shtm
2- Virginia Beach
http://www.vbfun.com/visitors/default.aspx
3- Virginia Marine Resources Commission
http://www.mrc.virginia.gov/
4 – Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel
http://www.cbbt.com/fishing.html
5 – VMRC Fishing Regulations
http://www.mrc.state.va.us/regulations/swrecfishingrules.shtm
6 – Virginia Beach Anglers Club
http://virginiabeachanglersclub.org/
7- Tidewater Anglers Club
http://tidewateranglersclub.org/
8- Chesapeake Light Tower
http://vbsf.net/articles/virginias-chesapeake-light-tower/
9-Cape Henry
Teresa, I couldn’t get this link to work here, but I think it is o.k. in the text?
Categories:
Living the Life
Fishing
Tags:
Blueline tilefish
Grouper
Fishing citation
World class fishing
Striped bass
Tautog
Speckled Trout
Red Drum
Black Drum
Puppy Drum
Flounder
Golden tilefish
Blueline tilefish
Black bellied rosefish
Bluefish
Grey trout
Flounder
Dolphin
Marlin
Mahi mahi
Roundhead
Sea mullet
Tuna
Pictures: Please use Raver drawing of a croaker in conjunction with any pictures you like from the group I sent you for this blog. Thanks. Call me if you have any questions.
Take care,
Mike

24 white marlin...ONE DAY, ONE ANGLER!

24 white marlin...ONE DAY, ONE ANGLER!

Memorable angling awaits fishermen seeking white marlin, cobia, croaker, tilefish, flounder and spot along with numerous other soon-to-migrate species. Students are back in school now just as many species also “school up” prior to leaving Virginia Beach waters. Simply put, this is prime time to sample our waters. And oh, did anyone mention less angling pressure too? Normally idyllic fall weather and fall lodging rates combine to make September and October must fish months for Virginia Beach.

White marlin fishing continues to be world-class bar none! Boats choosing to troll are averaging four to six hookups per trip while those working live baits are attracting up to 20 billfish a trip! This fishery has traditionally stayed reel-screaming hot through September. Blue marlin, wahoo, dolphin and tuna make up the rest of the offshore mix.

Cobia are now feeding from Cape Charles across the mouth of Chesapeake Bay and east to Cape Henry as well as along the oceanfront. Splendid catches are also coming from the line of CB buoys leading into the Bay. Many fish exceed 50 pounds.

A cobia on the dock

A cobia on the dock

Red drum are schooling off Cape Charles and will be heading south to offer great sport while migrating past the oceanfront and Sandbridge surf. Juvenile red drum, also known as “puppy drum,” are biting inside the inlets with Lynnhaven Inlet providing top action.

Spot remain a popular target species inside Rudee and Lynnhaven Inlets. Most spot now run two to a pound, with some fish close to twelve ounces or more. It remains to be seen whether this will be a year where one-pound citation-size spot make an appearance.

Bluefish and Spanish mackerel are still actively feeding. Tide rips at Cape Henry and CBBT channel openings between the rock islands are good bets for both species. Troll small gold and silver Clark spoons (#00) to access this action. With all the bait in the water, there were even two great catches made right outside Rudee Inlet: a 35 lb. king mackerel and a 4 lb. Spanish mackerel! Both fish qualified for free Virginia Saltwater Fishing Tournament citations.

Flounder are another species on the inshore favorites list. Flatfish limits to 23 inches are coming from areas including the Small Boat Channel, the Yancey Wreck, the 3rd and 4th islands of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, ship channel edges, and the 8 and 12-mile markers of the CBBT. Moreover, the CBBT Highrise Bridge area normally becomes a flounder hot spot in October. Inlet flounder, while trending smaller, are also still biting. Fish with Gulp, live minnows and strip baits for best results.

Croaker by Duane Raver

Croaker by Duane Raver

Croaker are peaking now with plenty of fish exceeding 12 inches. Find a croaker school and action can be non-stop! Sheepshead, triggerfish and spadefish are still here with spadefish biting well around the 4th island of the CBBT. Fish tight to structure and don’t wait – all four species will soon be gone.

Grey trout promise fast action – if you can locate a school. Sonar scanning works well to reveal trout schools. Good starting points are the northern stretch of the CBBT, particularly around the 12-mile post and the Highrise Bridge.

Captain’s Tip: To increase chances for a citation spot (16 ounces), fish a Carolina rig with a small egg sinker coupled with a #4 hook and a generous piece of bloodworm. High-low bottom rigs are traditional, but this rig should attract larger spot for you.

Steer 113 degrees from Cape Henry, travel 30 miles east and you arrive at a fish magnet called the Powell wreck. As part of the “Triangle Wrecks,” which includes the World War II vessels Luckenback and Morgan, these ships are currently frequented by super-size flounder, spadefish, amberjack and jumbo black sea bass. As fall shifts to winter, the same wrecks will soon hold voracious bluefish along with tasty tautog and codfish. The Triangle Wrecks are just one of many offshore fishing locations drawing anglers to Virginia Beach waters. Enjoying this fishing smorgasbord is only a charter or head boat reservation away!

The Triangle Wrecks, a VB fish magnet

The Triangle Wrecks, a VB fish magnet

In the deep: Tilefish continue to be a top draw for offshore trips to the Continental Shelf. There is a real chance here for a saltwater fishing citation coupled with some great fishing. Other typical catches on these trips are large sea bass, barrelfish, black-bellied rosefish and grouper.

Other late season possible catches are amberjack at the South Tower southeast of Rudee Inlet along with feisty jack crevalle in inshore waters.

One fast fish - wahoo!

One fast fish - wahoo!

Noteworthy Catches

Among recent citations: a 181 lb. bigeye tuna (Norfolk Canyon), a 52  lb. wahoo (Norfolk Canyon), a 67 lb. cobia (CB Buoy line), a 35 lb. king mackerel (outside Rudee Inlet),a 30 lb. bull dolphin,a 4 lb. Spanish mackerel (outside Rudee Inlet), and a 4 lb. 4 oz. triggerfish (CBBT).

Best Bets

Offshore: White marlin

Inshore: Cobia, croaker, flounder

Inlets: Spot, croaker

Deep Drop: Blueline tilefish

See you on the water. Tight lines and hard strikes to all!
Capt. Mike


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Up the Creek with a Paddle

September 22nd, 2014 by Katherine Jackson

Munden 2Located in the rural section of Virginia Beach, Munden Point Park is described by some people as a well-kept secret. Near the North Carolina state line, the one hundred-acre park features a picturesque tract on the North Landing River, which is part of the Intracoastal Waterway. In addition to a boat ramp, the park has an eighteen-hole disc golf course, ball fields, playgrounds, picnic shelters, and a tiny amphitheater for weddings and other events.

We recently took our canoe to Munden Point to explore Oakum Creek, a mile and a half waterway adjacent to the park. It was a beautiful morning as weMunden 1 launched the boat into the North Landing River, sunny and bright, with enough wind to whip up small waves. Boat traffic on the river was light – a few trawlers, runabouts and jet skis. After paddling about an eighth of a mile along the riverbank, we entered the mouth of Oakum Creek and began a leisurely, flat-water paddle. The creek winds and turns, its banks lined by cypress trees with their jutting-up-knees, evergreens, cat tails, flowering pickerel weed, and pink and white wildflowers. Dragonflies fluttered around us, fish jumped, songbirds chirped, and a hawk soared over a field adjacent to the creek. At times the surface of the water was a mirror; at other times, the wind gusted across and the sunlight flashed on the ripples.Munden 3

The only other boater we saw on the creek was a bass fisherman who was drifting along without his engine. Occasionally we heard motorboats on the river in the distance or a hoot from a disk golf tournament that was happening at the park, but for the most part, we were alone with nature: no roads, no houses, no worries. It was a peaceful paddle, a respite from the clock-driven demands of daily life.

Munden Point Park has rental canoes and kayaks for use on Oakum Creek. Call 757-426-5296 to check availability. If you bring your own canoe, there is no fee for launching, and you can explore the river as well. The water level and the distance that can be paddled on the creek vary, depending on how much the wind is pushing water up into the creek. We spent about two hours paddling upstream and back. Although it takes a while to get to the park, it’s a pleasant drive through the countryside, past horse pastures and pumpkin patches and quaint crossroads. On the way home, we stopped at one of the many farm stands to stock up on local produce: tomatoes, corn, squash and potatoes. People associate Virginia Beach with ocean sports, but Munden Point Park offers a chance to float up a creek with a paddle.


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